Most viewed datasets

  • This dataset contains all known hydropower developments across the Greater Mekong Subregion although is not a complete dataset. It includes original data collected by Open Development Cambodia and Open Development Vietnam as well as sources from International Rivers and the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Challenge Program on Water and Food - Mekong.
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  • This is the 1.0.1 version of the Level 1 product, of a sub-nationally georeferenced dataset of Chinese official finance activities between 2000 and 2014 in three ecologically sensitive regions -- the Tropical Andes in South America, the Great Lakes of Africa, and the Mekong Delta in Southeast Asia.
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  • Dataset containing a series of CSV resources containing re-usable data exposed over the datastore api for the ODI law metadata forms.
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  • The 2017 by-elections will be held on April 1. There are approximately 2.3 million voters who can go to the polls to choose from among 94 candidates (including 7 independents) and 24 political parties for 19 vacant seats. Voting will take place in 8 states and regions: Yangon, Kayah, Chin, Mon, Rakhine, Shan, Bago, and Sagaing.
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  • This database represents the historic, current and future estimates and projections with number of inhabitants for the world's largest urban areas from 1950-2050. The data covers cities and other urban areas with more than 750,000 people.
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  • A list of companies that are invested or have interest in investments within the five Lower Mekong Countries that ODM focuses on.
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  • Data used for dropdown options in the Agreements metadata forms. Definitions of each term is provided and also available within the Partner wiki https://wiki.opendevelopmentmekong.net/partners:document_types#agreements_document_types
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  • The MIMU have been tracking more than 200 indicators from various sources and the dataset is available through their website.
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Most viewed library records

  • This report contains a summary of issues relating to sustainable management of environmental resources for Inlay Lake and its watershed, in the context of increasing pressures from international and domestic tourists. The environmental information and recommendations for actions are based on the best available information, but there are significant limitations in the extent and reliability of baseline data. Data on the Inlay Lake region in this report should be taken as indicative of conditions, rather than verified measurements. Large variations in data from different sources are apparent, such as the common use of a single figure to describe depth, width, length and area of a large lake with varying depths and an irregular shoreline. Much information is anecdotal, and has been included to fill gaps in measured data. Nonetheless, there are sufficient data to identify priorities to address immediate threats to the health of the Inlay Lake ecosystem and its watershed, as well as threats to the health and well-being of dependent human communities. The report recommends future monitoring to acquire consistent baseline information and regular monitoring updates. Knowledge gaps and priorities for further research are also identified. Some confusion may arise from multiple spellings of names and places in Myanmar language. The spellings used in this report have been standardised, but there may be two or three alternate variations for the same place names or personal names.
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  • The Destination Management Plan (DMP) for the Inlay Lake Region is the result of extesive stakeholder consultations, interviews, focus group discussions, workshops and expert analysis of a region stretching from Ywangan Township of the Danu Self-Administerd Zone in the north to Loikaw City in the south; from Kalaw in the west, to Hopong Township of the Pa-O Self Administered Zone in the east. The region covers over 19,000 square kilometres (7,340 square miles) and is home to an estimated 1.4 million people. The DMP provides a situational analysis of the current tourism situation in Myanmar and how this links to the Inlay Lake Region, provides a summary of the environmental issues, provides a strategic direction for sustainable tourism development and the "visitor economy" and provides key action points required to achieve a world-class tourism destination. The region will certainly be the target of donor, government and private sector funded development projects: this DMP provides a framework for funding activities that are based upon research and the wishes and needs of local communities, business, government, community organisations and the natural environment. Most importantly the DMP presents a means for the people of the Inlay Lake Region to have their say on how they would like to see tourism develop in their homelands, whilst addressing the needs of the tourism industry in order to create a sustainable tourism destination that is a "great place to visit, work and live".
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  • The Plan is based on adoption of a “Community Based Approach” to resource management, with the realization that no Plan or Project involving communities can succeed if the communities are not empowered to take charge as “owners”, given a lead role in decision making and provisions made for their wholehearted participation in its implementation. This approach has been adopted taking into consideration the following actions: - Adopting a Watershed Approach for conservation and sustainable development of the Lake and its Watershed areas. - Integrating Biodiversity conservation as a priority consideration into Developmental Planning to minimize impacts on the ecosystems and species endemism. - Peoples’ Participatory Approach to mobilize local communities within the Lake and its Watershed areas, to take ownership of this Long Term Restoration and Conservation Plan and its realization. To actively assume a keen interest and lead role in all activities concerning implementation of the Plan. - Adopting proactive measures to address problems at the source while they are manageable; rather than assume a reactive attitude of addressing crisis situations arising as a result of neglect, as curative measures. - Revive and incorporate Indigenous Knowledge and Traditional Practices relating to Watershed Management and Biodiversity conservation that are practical, applicable and cost effective. - Apply Knowledge Based Techniques through Research and Development. - Conduct effective Monitoring and Evaluation on a regular basis. - Develop a strong and capable Institutional Framework that will be instilled with professional dedication and motivation.
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  • This report examines hydropower development in Myanmar to explore a fundamental challenge: how can governments make informed decisions about infrastructure development that will deliver the broadest range of benefits to their people over the long run? Hydropower provides a clear example of this challenge. For many countries, hydropower is a strategic resource that could increase energy supply at low costs and make important contributions to water resources management and development objectives (potential “co-benefits” of hydropower development and management). However, current approaches to hydropower development often fail to achieve this potential for broad benefits and incur high environmental and social costs. Decisions are often made at the scale of individual projects without a comprehensive understanding of how these projects fit within the larger context of both infrastructure systems and social and environmental resources. Short-term and project-focused decisions are not likely to produce hydropower systems that can fulfill their potential to achieve broad benefits and balanced development. This is because they will be systems in name only. In reality, they are groups of individual projects that are not well coordinated, miss opportunities for more optimal designs, and often cause high social and environmental costs—contributing to conflict and uncertainty for future investment. Most governments do not have a process in place to plan true systems and to strategically select projects that are in the best public interest. We explore two broad hypotheses. First, hydropower planning at a system scale can help governments, developers and other stakeholders find better-balanced solutions with lower impacts and conflicts. Second, countries can adopt system-scale approaches in ways that avoid creating unacceptable burdens or delays. In summary, we propose that a systematic and comprehensive approach to hydropower planning and system design can help countries deliver better development outcomes for their people. We tested these hypotheses by developing an illustrative framework for hydropower planning and investment in Myanmar.
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  • As this literature portrait shows, Inle Lake has been a research object for many years, but it has never been studied in conjunction with the structural dynamics that have been taking place in Myanmar, South-East Asia, and in the whole world, while it is one of those very territories which anchor the country into globalization, one of those “gateways” of global flows into the country, its population and its culture. In other words, this extraordinary laboratory of globalization has never been put in the scale-nesting that link it to the world and its dynamics. To achieve such a task, the researcher in human sciences may wonder a few questions: To what extent is Inle Lake integrating more and more in a set of scales that connect it to the rest of the country, of Asia and of the world? What are the vectors of this integration: what are the pathways and nature of flows between the lake and those scales, and what are the networks and the stakeholders that build and organize them? How does the globalization process impact the local scale through a reshuffle of the territory and its balance, a mutation of its economic system, a transformation of its landscapes and the ways of life of its inhabitants? To what extent can Inle Lake be defined as a region under transition, where tourism, often built by exogenous players and under transition itself, is considered as an alternative to the “traditional activities” that have been through hard times?
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  • While the economic literature has yet to establish whether greater electricity consumption leads to faster economic growth, or vice versa, it is widely accepted that the better provision of electricity can enable pro-poor growth. Because electricity consumption is expected to grow in emerging economies such as Myanmar, it is important that the government prioritize its stable, efficient, and affordable supply. This paper assesses Myanmar’s electricity sector and recommends several concrete policy options to enable government to address issues such as supply security, greater accessibility, and affordability, especially for the poor and disadvantaged. The paper also estimates infrastructure demand and the corresponding investment requirements to narrow the supply gap in the power sector.
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  • The EMP has been prepared from a strategic perspective requiring that all concerned Ministries align to a common energy development plan based on an understanding of fundamental economic development needs. According to government policy preference the EMP predicts that Myanmar’s energy sector will be require an investment of between USD 30 to 40 billion over a 15 to 20 year period. The outlook for the supply of natural gas in particular is uncertain and the EMP recognizes a potential constraint in the next decade. In an environment where there are technology choices and resource constraints a strategic approach is needed to decide the best use of energy in support of national development goals.
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  • Myanmar has one of the lowest rates of electrification in Southeast Asia. Energy poverty also affects population with access to electricity due to shortages and poor reliability of power supply. With help from the global sustainable energy for all initiative, led by the World Bank and the United Nation (UN), the government (through the ministry of electric power and the ministry of livestock, fisheries, and rural development) is preparing a national electrification plan (NEP) which includes recommended geospatial, least cost grid rollout plan for achieving universal access to electricity by 2030, and an investment prospectus for the phased financing of the investment needs. The NEP also presents institutional reforms required to ensure alignment of funding sources and accountabilities for effective and timely implementation of the electrification program. The development of NEP is coordinated with the government's ongoing effort for the preparation of the power sector master plan in which related strategic issues of the future energy mix in power generation and transmission expansion are being addressed. Government of Myanmar should formally adopt the NEP, including the roadmap and the institutional implementation plan via government decree.
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Most viewed laws

  • The new Myanmar Electricity Law was enacted by the Myanmar Parliament on October 27 last year, replacing the old Electricity Law of 1984. The old electricity law was enacted during Myanmar’s socialist period and lacked the legal framework to include private sector participation in power projects and independent power producers.
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  • Enacted to ensure access by the people safe and efficacious drugs. Describes requirement for licensing in relation to manufacturing, storage, distribution and sale of drugs. It also includes provisions on formation and authorization of Myanmar Food and Drug Board of Authority.
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  • Provides basis for registration, licensing and regulation of nursing and midwifery practices and describes organization, duties and powers of the nurse and midwife council.
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  • This law was enacted to develop private health care services in accordance with the national health policy, to enable private health care services to be carried out systematically as and integrated part in the national health care system, to enable utilizing the resources of private sector in providing health care to the public effectively, to provide choice of health care provider for the public by establishing public health care services and to ensure quality services are provided at fair cost with assurance of responsibility.
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  • Describes functions and responsibilities of health personnel and citizens in relation to prevention and control of communicable diseases. It also describes measures to be taken in relation to environmental sanitation, reporting and control of outbreaks of epidemics and penalties for those failing to comply. The law also authorizes the Ministry of Health to issue rules and procedures when necessary with approval of the government.
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  • Describes functions and responsibilities of health personnel and citizens in relation to prevention and control of communicable diseases. It also describes measures to be taken in relation to environmental sanitation, reporting and control of outbreaks of epidemics and penalties for those failing to comply. The law also authorizes the Ministry of Health to issue rules and procedures when necessary with approval of the government.
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  • Related to control of drug abuse and describes measures to be taken against those breaking the law. Enacted to prevent danger of narcotic and psychotropic substances and to implement the provisions of United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances. Other objectives are to cooperate with state parties to the United Nations Convention, international and regional organizations in respect to the prevention of the danger of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances. According to that law Central Committee for Drug Abuse Control (CCADC), Working Committees, Sectors and Regional Committees were formed to carry out the designated tasks in accordance with provisions of the law. The law also describes procedures relating to registration, medication and deregistration of drug users.
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